AFTER KYOTO, UNRELEASED DOE REPORT SAYS ELECTRIC DEREGULATION WILL DRIVE UP GLOBAL WARMING ABOVE PROMISED LEVEL

This report is a follow-up to the story in ALPN's October issue "Local Efforts to Fight Global Warming at Risk in Deregulation."


A preview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) annual report on the energy outlook of the nation links electric industry deregulation to sharply increased greenhouse gas emissions which cause global warming, conflicting sharply with commitments made by Clinton Administration delegates to Kyoto today to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by seven (7) percent over fifteen (15) years.

Meanwhile, the still unreleased DOE report, "Early Release of the Annual Energy Outlook, 1998," a forecast of energy use and effects in the United States through the year 2020, indicates that by the year 2010 carbon dioxide emissions will be thirty-four (34) percent HIGHER than 1990 levels due to increased coal production and a slow down in the use of renewable energy.

The report said that competition resulting from electric industry restructuring is expected to dramatically increase the purchase of cheap electricity generated by coal, whose prices are expected to decrease from $18.50 a ton to $13.27 a ton by 2020. The U.S. electric industry is collectively the largest single domestic producer of carbon dioxide, the primary green house gas.

Like the 1992 Rio agreement on Global Warming (which President Bush refused to sign), the Kyoto agreement has no penalties for failing to meet commitments. Few of the Rio signatories have met their 1992 commitments.

Link to Kyoto Protocol Link to DOE Preliminary Report


Copyright (c) 1997 by the American Local Power Project.